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Learning Disabilities

The Power of Learning Disabilities

1. Insights

2. Tips #1 to #5: How to Deal with Learning Disabilities

3. 1452 to Present: List of Famous People with Learning Disabilities

4. Tips #6 to #10: The Iceberg Principle

5. Learning Disabilities and Neuroscience: Corpus Callosum

6. Learning Disabilities and Neuroscience: Neuroplasticity

7. Learning Disabilities and the New Creative Mind: Dyslexia

8. Learning Disabilities and the New Creative Mind: ADD/ADHD

9. Learning Disabilities and the New Creative Mind:: Emotionally Sensitive People/Emotional Disability

10. Symptoms Overview: Learning Disabilities Challenges & Strengths

11. Learning Disabilities: FAQs

12. Instant download eBook: What's the Deal with Learning Disability?






1. INSIGHTS


Insight #1: History shows that some of the most creative people had learning disabilities.

Insight #2: If you have a learning disability, or know someone who does, look for the amazing ability!




2. TIPS #1 to #5: How to Deal With Learning Disabilities


Tip #1: If you have a learning disability, KNOW that you are in the company of Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Beethoven, Agatha Christie, Tom Cruise, Whoopie Goldberg, and Robin Williams.

Tip #2: Being in the company of some of the most creative people, comes with a big responsibility. LEARN from the past.

Tip #3: If you think you might have a learning disability, but you are not sure, FIND OUT. Either your educational on-campus Health Services, or your general Health Care provider will help you to find out if you have a learning disability. You can begin by going to the Student Services office or Health Services office of your higher educational institution. You need to explore your disability to better recognize your amazing ability.

Tip #4: Even though you might consider it challenging to attend a college or university, UNDERSTAND that the higher educational system will support you to accomplish your goal in getting a degree. This support ranges from providing free laptops/computers/printers to you, allowing you to take tests in a more relaxed setting, or providing you with more time to complete tests. You might also qualify for financial assistance.

Tip #5: Having an amazing creative gift comes with a price. FIND the unique gift behind your disability and BE AWARE of the price and the challenges that you are facing. The list below might help you gain some important insights.

Back to Top Tips 1 to 5: How to Deal with LD List of Famous People with LD Tips 6 to 10: Iceberg Principle Corpus Callosum Neuroplasticity
Dyslexia ADD/ADHD Emotional Disability Symptoms Overview FAQs eBook






3. Famous People with Learning Disabilities

Did you Know?
Orville Dickinson Churchill Einstein Whoopie


  Disabilities/Challenges Abilities
Leonardo da Vinci
(1452-1519)
Dyslexia, ADD, ED
spelling, writing right to left in mirror image,
incomplete projects, distracted
social issues
secret private life
painter, sculptor, scientist, botanist, inventor, mathematician, architect, engineer, anatomist, musician, writer
innovative
multitasking
intense curiosity
loved to observe nature
vegetarian
deep respect for life
Galileo Galilei
(1564-1642)
ADD
boredom at the university
outspoken to his professors
frequent absences from class
left university without degree
constant questioning of lectures and text at the university
little faith in established authority
enjoyed controversy, arguments
observational skills
being able to make astonishing connections
discoveries in astrology, astronomy, math, physics, technology, philosophy
considered "father of modern physics" and "father of science".
Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-1827)
ED
social issues
lack of self-restraint, discipline, culture
private issues
emotional issues, anger, depression, melancholy
laughing too much
introvert nature
frequent moves
strange personal habits (wearing dirty clothing)
poor physical health
washing compulsively
never married
fears, terror, anxiety
suicidal thoughts, depression
composer and pianist
ability to feel into the heights and depths of human emotions
ability to transfer emotions into music
sense of humor
awareness of his great artistic gift
awareness of his artistic destiny
awareness of despair
philosopher
"forced to become a philosopher already in my twenty-eighth year, - oh it is not easy, and for the artist much more difficult than for anyone else."*
Hans Christian Anderson
(1805-1875)
ED, Dyslexia
highly emotional
fears, hysterical attacks,
effeminate
unattractive
epileptic fits
physical and emotional abuse
alcoholic mother
backward, unwilling pupil, homely
world-famous author of fairy tales
internationally renowned and treasured artist
Thomas Edison
(1847-1931)
ADD
persistent questioning
self-centered behavior
scrambled thoughts
non-conformist
easily distracted
larger than average head
broad forehead
innovative
experimental
curious
inventor
businessman
prolific projects often occurring simultaneously (1093 patents)
ability to focus on multitude of tasks simultaneously
Orville Wright
(1867-1948)
ADD
mischievous behavior
class absences
did not graduate
inquisitive & curious mind
scientific experiments
inventions
own printing business with Wilbur
aeronautic accomplishments
Winston Churchill
(1874-1965)
Dyslexia, ADD, ED
bored quickly
mild depression
seasonal affective disorder syndrome
did not achieve much academically
failed courses numerous times
refused to study Latin and Greek
poor work and lack of effort
restless
high energy level
meddling
difficult to discern priorities or to stick with them

"He is here, there, and everywhere.." *

frail in health
accident prone
naughty, bumptious,
difficult to manage as a child
British Prime Minister
author, politician, inventor,, innovator, leader
self-learner,
intellectual curiosity
excellent management style


"....a gifted child who was therefore difficult." *
Albert Einstein
(1879-1955)
ADD
clashes with authority
resented school regimen
resented rote learning
shy child
very little skill for anything as a child
preferred to learn on his own
preferred travelling instead of preparing for exam, failed exam in general knowledge
physicist
great sense of curiosity
independent, critical thinker
played violin
passion for music
studied physics on his own
"The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic emotion. Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science."
Pablo Picasso
(1881-1973)
Dyslexia
reversed up/down, front/back
questioned authority
bad student
class absences
painter, sculptor, ceramicist, stage-designer, cofounder of cubism
innovative
visual perspective
unique perceptual ability
Agatha Christie
(1890-1976)
Dyslexia

"I, myself, was always recognized...as the 'slow one' in the family. It was quite true, and I knew it and accepted it. Writing and spelling were always terribly difficult for me. My letters were without originality. I was ...an extraordinarily bad speller and have remained so until this day." *

shyness
stage fright
best-selling novelist, crime and detective novels, short stories, plays
interest in music, dance, singing
original writing ideas
strong interest in reading and love for books
ability to break up,
analyze, and re-assemble objects from a multitude of innovative viewpoints
Putting the pieces
together in a greater and inventive context leaves the reader engaged and the murderer in her novels
as the most unlikely suspect.
pottery,
artifacts (married archeologist)
Harry Belafonte
(1927-present)
Dyslexia
born into poverty
high school drop out
"I was filled with discontent...couldn’t focus in the classroom... teachers were just really frustrated with my distraction ... left school one after the other there was always a celebration that I was out of the school... teachers were just overcome with my distractedness. (Laughter)...What it was was that it was an extreme case of dyslexia, and I could not really keep words in focus. They skipped and inverted and all the problems that we faced — nobody knew what that was, except that measured against my appearance I did not seem to be living up to my potential. I wasn’t living up to what my native intelligence, as they call it, appeared to be, as opposed to the failure of my academic pursuit."
Harry Belafonte in his interview with Tavis Smiley
Actor, producer, singer, music composer and arranger. He was the first recording artist to have a million-selling album and broke down racial barriers as TV's first Black producer and the first Black performer to win an Emmy. He's also known for his longtime and passionate commitment to civil and human rights issues. Belafonte was a confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and raised money to release imprisoned civil rights protesters. He chronicles his journey in the inspiring memoir, My Song.
Cher Dyslexia
dreadful school experience
dropped out of school at 16
award-winning actress
singer, songwriter
director, author, entertainer
Whoopie Goldberg Dyslexia
dreadful school experience
dropped out of school at 16
actress
entertainer
Anthony Hopkins Dyslexia
Hopkins recalls: “I was lousy in school: a real screw-up, a moron. I was antisocial and didn’t bother with the other kids… I didn’t know what I was doing there. That’s why I became an actor.”
actor
Eli Broad
(June 6, 1933 - present)

Dyslexia
Eli Broad describes himself as:
- demanding,
- unreasonable
- controversial
- in pursuit of excellence
- asks a lot of questions
- risk-taking
- asks "why not" if someone tells him "you can't do that"
- pursues the untried
- restless
- reads 4 newspapers a day
- has a 3-hour social rule (does not stay longer at any social event for more than 3 hours)
Source: Charlie Rose Interview 5/8/12

"The intervening 27 years were filled with hard work - most of it directed toward an end I couldn't see but one I hoped would be profitable. I had been prepared for that sort of marathon effort by personal experience. When I was a kid, I had fought a lonely struggle with a problem whose name - dyslexia- I wouldn't learn until doctors diagnosed our son with it decades later. As a boy, all I knew was that it was hard for me to read, and there was no way around that except to read a lot, and slowly, until I got the hang of it. It wasn't easy. But I got to the point that, as an adult, I could read- and enjoy- four newspapers each morning before work."
Source: Eli Broad, The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking

Los Angeles billionaire, started out as a CPA accountant.

- renowned business leader who built two Fortune 500 companies from the ground up - over a five-decade career in business.
- founder of both SunAmerica Inc. and KB Home

- the Broad Foundation invests in advancing innovative scientific and medical research in the areas of human genomics, stem cell research and inflammatory bowel disease.
- partnership with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University and the Whitehead Institute,
- in 2003, a $100 million founding gift to create The Eli and Edythe Broad Institute for biomedical research.

- philanthropic activities in art, education,

book: The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking
     
     
Tom Cruise Dyslexia
mother had dyslexia
actor
Michael Phelps ADD/ADHD
surplus energy
medication
behavior modification in school
Gold medal Olympic champion in swimming

* Sources of all quotes are listed at the end of our Learning Disability Book.

Back to Top Tips 1 to 5: How to Deal with LD List of Famous People with LD Tips 6 to 10: Iceberg Principle Corpus Callosum Neuroplasticity
Dyslexia ADD/ADHD Emotional Disability Symptoms Overview FAQs eBook





4. TIPS #6 to #10: The Iceberg Principle


Tip #6: In order to understand a learning disability, one can apply the iceberg principle:


Iceberg

The obvious, - the learning disability - is the tip of the iceberg. Many parents, teachers, or caretakers can easily see a child's academic problems. Millions of dollars are being spent on special education, tutors, and private education. However, what one sees is only one-ninth of the iceberg.


The less obvious, or hidden portion (eight-ninth) of the iceberg, - the unique ability- is hidden beneath the water surface and can be difficult to judge by merely looking at what is above the surface. Every year, less and less public money is spent on programs that would support a child's development of his/her unique talent.



Tip #7: Not recognizing the tip of an iceberg, or failure to recognize a learning disability, leads to a chaotic encounter to anyone who comes near it.


Tip #8: Not recognizing the foundation of the iceberg, or failure to recognize the unique abilities, leads to an even more chaotic existence for the learning disabled as well as anyone who comes near it.


Tip #9: However, what happens if the invisible becomes visible and the visible becomes invisible? What if the amazing talent becomes visible and dominant but the underlying disability is ignored?


Iceberg down

It would be just a matter of time until the iceberg would fall apart and tip over!




As the iceberg falls and comes crashing down, alcoholism, depression, drug abuse, promiscuous behavior, suicide, and violence come to life.


Have you ever wondered why so many famous and successful people end up in rehab?


Tip #10: Identifying the visible as well as the invisible and finding a balance for BOTH disability and ability is crucial in order to ensure a most fulfilling path in life.

Back to Top Tips 1 to 5: How to Deal with LD List of Famous People with LD Tips 6 to 10: Iceberg Principle Corpus Callosum Neuroplasticity
Dyslexia ADD/ADHD Emotional Disability Symptoms Overview FAQs eBook









5. Corpus Callosum: The Inter-sphere Highway

The Corpus Callosum has been linked by scientists to Dyslexia, ADHD, Emotional Disabilities, and Autism. A timing problem in interhemispheric transfer of information as well as insufficient information passing between the two halves of the brain has been the object of most recent studies.

Corpus

The New Creative Mind intentionally crosses the inter-sphere highway (the corpus callosum)
to exercise both hemispheres of the brain.


Corpus Callosum:
Left and right hemisphere are brought together in the Corpus Callosum. The Corpus Callosum merges the information from both sides and facilitates the communication between the two hemispheres.


The Corpus Callosum is a large structure in the brain that connects the left and right cerebral hemispheres. It consists of a very thick bundle of nerve fibers (with myelinated and unmyelinated axons).

Information is passed from the left hemisphere to the right and vice versa. This is a vital function as the two hemispheres perform different tasks and need to communicate not only efficiently but extremely fine and rapid.




There are specific activities that can stimulate the left brain:


solving crossword
word search puzzles

recalling new information

hand gestures

classifications of pictures or words into categories

recalling complex narratives

recognizing someone you have met

name recognition

listening to music primarily with your right ear

doing math


Corpus2



brainareas



The better and more refined the highway, the more and the faster information can flow between the left and right hemisphere.


















There are activities that can stimulate the right brain:


dealing with emotional issues

recalling memorized lists

seeing or feeling objects of different sizes,

seeing different colors

seeing unfamiliar faces

meeting someone new


listening to music with your left ear


Corpus Callosum: Functions & Characteristics

The corpus callosum grows constantly throughout childhood and adolescence. Behavioral studies suggest the existence of a critical time period for callosal functional development starting around the age of 6 years.

A statistical analysis revealed that children whose callosal isthmus increased in thickness over the course of 2 years showed a decrease in interhemispheric information transfer. Children exhibiting a decrease in isthmus thickness revealed an increase in information transfer. These results might indicate a refinement process of the callosal connections to optimize the neuronal communication between the developing cerebral hemispheres.


The story told in "Rain Man" was a Hollywood fabrication, but the character of Raymond Babbit was inspired by a flesh-and-blood individual, Kim Peek, whose remarkable talents despite very severe disabilities closely mirrored those portrayed in the film.  Peek, who died in December 2009 of a heart attack at age 58, was born with macrocephaly and congenital brain abnormalities including the absence of a corpus callosum. From an early age, Peek had a prodigious memory, and as an adult he read and memorized whole books as well as enormous amounts of information. With his father, he travelled and spoke about his condition in the wake of the fame that came with "Rain Man." Psychiatrist Darold Treffert, M.D., who served as a consultant for the film script, called "Rain Man" a "remarkably accurate and sensitive" portrayal of savant syndrome.

In addition to an absence of the corpus callosum, similar conditions are hypogensis (partial formation), dysgensis (malformed), and hypoplasia (underdevelopment, including too thin).

In order to increase function or activation of the left or right brain via the corpus callosum, clinicians may use big letters made up of small letters. If you look at the small letters you will fire the right cerebellum to the left brain. If you look at the big letters you will fire the left cerebellum to right brain.

Auditory stimulation (listening to nature sounds, clicks of a metronome, or Mozart in a major key) in the left ear comes to the right brain and vice versa for the right ear.

Transfer of information through touch from the fingertips of one hand to the other without looking requires use of the corpus callosum. The information on which finger was touched must cross this neural bridge to get to the opposite hand.

"Design Magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) scans were obtained from children with developmental dyslexia and from matched control children. Morphometric measurements were examined to determine if regional differences existed in the corpus callosum between these two groups of children. Setting Magnetic resonance imaging studies were completed at Athens (Ga) Magnetic Imaging. ... Results: Analysis of the corpus callosum revealed that the anterior region of interest (the genu) was significantly smaller in the dyslexic children. Significant correlations existed between reading achievement and the region-of-interest measurements for the genu and splenium. Measured intelligence, chronologic age, and gender were not related to region-of-interest measurements of the corpus callosum. Consistent with previous studies, the dyslexic individuals were characterized by significant psychiatric comorbidity, particularly attention deficit disorder with and without hyperactivity. Reported familial left-handedness also distinguished the dyslexic children. ...Conclusions: Subtle neurodevelopmental variation in the morphology of the corpus callosum may be associated with the difficulty that dyslexic children experience in reading and on tasks involving interhemispheric transfer." Source: Archives of Neurology


Back to Top Tips 1 to 5: How to Deal with LD List of Famous People with LD Tips 6 to 10: Iceberg Principle Corpus Callosum Neuroplasticity
Dyslexia ADD/ADHD Emotional Disability Symptoms Overview FAQs eBook






6. Neuroplasticity


With the new discovery of neuroplasticity
(the brain's ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections through action and experience), neuroscientists are now revising their previous findings of the immutability of the brain after development with the more recent research showing how the brain can, and does, change.


With new scientific techniques like MRIs (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), or Pet scans (Position Emission Tomography), researchers can observe changes in an individual's brain as it responds to an odor, visual stimuli, auditory stimuli, or other stimuli.

The right shows the Pet scan of a person as he/she reacts to outside stimuli.



brain11




Similarly, the damaged region of stroke patients can be precisely localized by the lack of blood flow, metabolic activity, and neural activity.

brainpetscan




While we are born with a complete set of neurons, the connections between them are determined in major part by a learning process. Even though the overall program for determining which neurons should be connected together is under genetic control, it is external stimuli which are crucially important in determining what neuronal network connections are made.

Neuroplasticity, the brain's ability to form new neuronal pathways and connections through action and experience adds a new perspective and insight into the brain's response to positive/negative short-term stimuli and long-term stimuli.


Neuroscientific research has found that repeated action and experience can change both the brain's physical structure (anatomy) and functional organization (physiology) not only during brain development of a child but throughout a person's lifetime. Research can now show that substantial changes occur in certain brain areas, and that these changes can profoundly alter the pattern of neuronal activation in response to experience.


Neuroplasticity and Learning Disabilities


Unfortunately, neuroplasticity (the ability of the brain to restructure and reorganize itself through experience and action), can have a negative impact on a person's brain, especially young children. Brain plasticity is involved in the development of sensory functions. The brain is born immature and it adapts to sensory inputs (see above Pet scans) after birth.


Air Pollution:

Air pollution can have serious effects on how our brain and creative mind functions. Currently, air pollution is known to cause damage to the central nervous system by altering the blood-brain barrier, causing neurons in the cerebral cortex to degenerate and destroy glia cells. These changes can permanently alter brain structure and chemistry, resulting in various impairments, learning disabilities, and other disorders.


Nutritional Pollution:

Artificial colors, artificial sweeteners, and unnatural preservatives can alter neuronal as well as glia functions in the brain. Below is just one example of a recent research linking artificial colors with hyperactivity.

"In 2008 the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in Washington, DC, petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban artificial food dyes because of their connection to behavioral problems in children. Two years later, a new CSPI report, Food Dyes: A Rainbow of Risks, further concludes that the nine artificial dyes approved in the United States likely are carcinogenic, cause hypersensitivity reactions and behavioral problems, or are inadequately tested. Artificial dyes derived from petroleum are found in thousands of foods. In particular breakfast cereals, candy, snacks, beverages, vitamins, and other products aimed at children are colored with dyes. Even some fresh oranges are dipped in dye to brighten them and provide uniform color, says Michael Jacobson, executive director at CSPI. ..Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6 contain benzidene, a human and animal carcinogen permitted in low, presumably safe levels in dyes... Meanwhile, in Europe, as of July 2010 most foods that contain artificial dyes must carry labels warning they may cause hyperactivity in children. “ (Source: Environmental Health Perspectives)



Emotional Pollution:


Another study conducted by J. Douglas Bremner, M.D., and colleagues at the Yale University Medical School also linked left-brain damage to childhood physical or sexual abuse. When they compared MRI scans of 17 adult survivors of childhood physical or sexual abuse with those of 17 control subjects, they found the left hippocampus of the abused subjects was 12 percent smaller than that of the controls. What’s more, the abnormalities were mostly or even exclusively in the left hemisphere of the brain.

A study funded by the National Institutes of Health, NARSAD, and donations from the Simches and Rosenberg families. "Hurtful Words: Exposure to Peer Verbal Aggression Is Associated With Elevated Psychiatric Symptom Scores and Corpus Callosum Abnormalities" found that physical and verbal abuse can damage the corpus callosum. Physical and verbal abuse can result in a major reduction in the size of the corpus callosum. It also appears that the psychological impact of childhood physical abuse can especially harm the left hemisphere of the brain.


Empowering the New Creative Mind:

European scientists discovered Parkinson’s disease patients can suddenly become creative when they take dopamine therapy, producing pictures, sculptures, novels and poetry. However, the extreme focus on the new interests may limit performance of normal daily tasks and social activities. Key findings of the study included: The artwork presented by the patients was mainly drawings/paintings (83%), poetry/novels (50%) and sculpture (28%). In 78% of cases, the patients showed more than one skill, normally writing plus painting or drawing. Some of the patients produced art that was sold and books that were published, but, at the other end of the scale, some of the creative work was of a very poor quality. Source: PsychCentral.com


Human echolocation is a learned ability for humans to sense their environment from echoes. This ability is used by some blind people to navigate their environment and sense their surroundings in detail. Studies in 2010 and 2011 using Functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown that parts of the brain associated with visual processing are adapted for the new skill of echolocation. The potential powers of the new creative mind are infinite.


A number of studies have linked meditation practice to differences in cortical thickness or density of gray matter. One of the most well-known studies to demonstrate this was led by Sara Lazar, from Harvard University, in 2000. Richard Davidson, a neuroscientist at the University of Wisconsin, has led experiments in cooperation with the Dalai Lama on effects of meditation on the brain. His results suggest that long-term, or short-term practice of meditation results in different levels of activity in brain regions associated with such qualities as attention, anxiety, depression, fear, anger, the ability of the body to heal itself, and so on. These functional changes may be caused by changes in the physical structure of the brain.


Part of the reason for this [research] lies in new, more powerful brain-scanning technologies that not only can reveal a mind in the midst of meditation but also can detect enduring changes in brain activity months after a prolonged course of meditation. And it hasn't hurt that some well-known mainstream neuroscientists are now intrigued by preliminary reports of exceptional Buddhist mental skills. Paul Ekman of the University of California at San Francisco and Stephen Kosslyn of Harvard have begun their own studies of the mental capabilities of monks. In addition, a few rigorous, controlled studies have suggested that Buddhist-style meditation in Western patients may cause physiological changes in the brain and the immune system. Source: New York Times


Back to Top Tips 1 to 5: How to Deal with LD List of Famous People with LD Tips 6 to 10: Iceberg Principle Corpus Callosum Neuroplasticity
Dyslexia ADD/ADHD Emotional Disability Symptoms Overview FAQs eBook






7. The New Creative Mind and Dyslexia



If you have Dyslexia, or think you might have it, learn about both the challenges as well as the strengths of Dyslexia.

Symptoms of Dyslexia (Challenges): Strengths:
  • Usage of incorrect or inconsistent spelling
  • Skipping lines or words while reading or writing
  • Leaving out punctuation marks,
  • Tendency to omit, alter or substitute words
  • Confusing sounds like ch, th, sh,
    Confusing similar looking words like from/form, on/no
  • Struggling with short term memory
  • Confusing left/right, over/under, up/down,
  • Being uncoordinated
  • Showing poor time management skills
  • Struggling with sequences of letters or numbers
  • struggling with changed or reversed shapes
  • left-right confusion
  • difficulty remembering ordered lists, such as the months of the year
  • difficulty remembering a group of unrelated facts like the multiplication table
  • problems with fine motor control in handwriting
  • visual problems associated with motor control of the eyes
  • Unique and innovative thinking
  • unique visual & spatial ability
  • original pattern recognition
  • exceptional problem solving skills
  • Instead of going from point A to B, you prefer going your own individual way
  • heightened intuition and creativity




Dyslexia is most likely caused by a dominant right brain hemisphere which is responsible for creativity & innovative thinking.

An estimated 15 to 20 percent of the population, as many as 60 million Americans, has some form of learning disability involving difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, or mathematical abilities. These challenges often occur in people with normal or even high intelligence.

Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common and most carefully studied of the learning disabilities. It affects 80 percent of all those identified as learning-disabled.

Dyslexia is characterized by an unexpected difficulty in reading in children and adults who otherwise possess the intelligence, motivation, and schooling considered necessary for accurate and fluent reading.

According to some previous research, studies indicate that although there can be improvement, dyslexia is a persistent, chronic condition. There is a strong consensus that the central difficulty in most forms of dyslexia reflects a deficit within the language system — and more specifically, in a component of the language system called phonology. This results in difficulty transforming the letters on the page to the sounds of language. As children approach adolescence, one manifestation of dyslexia may be a very slow reading rate. Children may learn to read words accurately, but their reading will not be fluent or automatic.

With a new understanding of neuroplasticity, however, most recent research indicates that dyslexia is NOT a persistent, chronic condition.

All of the people listed below had or have Dyslexia:
Pablo Picasso, Leonardo Da Vinci, August Rodin (French sculptor), Jorn Utzon (architect who designed Sydney Opera house), Agatha Christie, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gustave Flaubert, W.B. Yeats, Ann Bancroft (Arctic Explorer), Alexander Graham Bell, John R. Horner (Jurassic Park), Pierre Curie (Physicist), Werner Von Braun, Erin Brockovich, George Patton, Henry Ford, William Hewlett, Charles Schwab, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Jefferson, John F. Kennedy, Nelson Rockefeller, Woodrow Wilson, George Washington, Cher, John Lennon, Harry Belafonte, Tom Cruise, Whoopi Goldberg, Jay Leno, Keanu Reeves, Henry Winkler, and Robin Williams. Source: What's the Deal with Learning Disability



If you have Dyslexia, there are several things that you can do for both your challenges and your strengths:

  Actions for the Creative Mind:  
1. Explore and support your talents Being dyslexic means that you have a great responsibility for being creative and innovative. Without dyslexic people, our world would be quite different. Many writers, painters, sculptors, inventors, explorers, architects, politicians, and business people are or were dyslexic. Because of their strong right hemisphere, many famous people were able to enrich the world with their unique, creative, and innovative thoughts.
2. Be the first in something. It appears that many dyslexic people are destined to be the first in something. You might be the first to come up with new ideas for sports, for academics, for finances, business, politics, or for other discoveries.
3. Know that you are not alone. If you have dyslexia, you might be struggling in school. Most famous people struggled in school and had terrible academic experiences. Reading about them can help you not to feel alone. Our What's the Deal with Learning Disability book describes their experiences, what they or their parents did to deal with school, and what they did differently to become famous.
4. Understand the brain This web page explains the most important aspects about the brain. Take the time to read the sections above about brain structure, left/right brain functions, and the corpus callosum. All of them play an important part in what causes dyslexia.

Dyslexia can be genetically inherited!

Look both at the challenges and talents that your parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents were facing to find out if dyslexia runs in your family.

The Center for Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology has reported that subtle neurodevelopmental variation in the corpus callosum may be associated with the difficulty that dyslectic children experience in reading and on tasks involving interhemispheric transfer of information. A poor allocation of neural space and insufficient arousal of the left hemisphere might encourage the by-passing of the corpus callosum and an inappropriate reliance on right hemispheric strategies during language and number processing.
Source: Archives of Neurology


High speed photography can show that dyslectics' movements on one side of the body are out of synchrony with movements on the other. It has been observed that if a dyslectic child hears a click, his right side turns toward the sound a fraction of a second before his left side turns. When he blinks, the right eyelid starts down before the left. When he smiles, the right side of his mouth turns up before the left one. All this happens so fast that it is unnoticeable to the naked eye, except for giving the impression that the child is a bit "twitchy." Apparently the child does not hear the sound twice, but the secondary signal that comes across the corpus callosum from the right hemisphere to the left is late getting there (timing issue), so in effect, the child appears to be reacting twice to a single stimulus. This effect could account for some of the hyperactivity and distractibility so common in LD children and would certainly make sustained attention tiring. Source: Reading from Scratch
5. Understand Neuroplasticity

During the last decades, neuroscientists have discovered that the brain can change its physical structure in response to action and experience. This ability of the brain is called neuroplasticity. You can change how your brain works and its structure through your actions. This discovery has led to promising new treatments for children with dyslexia.

Source: Dalai Lama: "How thinking can change the brain" .
6. Motivation The most common factor found among people who have successfully dealt with dyslexia is motivation. Motivation is a very strong force that connects all areas of the brain. Because of neuroplasticity, you can form new neuronal pathways, improve your inter-sphere corpus callosum transmissions, and strengthen your right/left brain functions.

Examples of the power of motivation are:

Despite her troubles with spelling, Agatha Christie became a famous mystery writer.
Despite trouble with math, JJ became a millionaire with computer programming.
Despite reading problems, Charles Schwab became the founder and CEO of the Charles Schwab Corporation, an American brokerage and banking company with 7.9 million client brokerage accounts and $1.65 trillion in assets.
7. Learn a music instrument. An excellent technique to strengthen your corpus callosum and increase the speed between your left/right brain hemispheres transmissions, is to play a music instrument.

The front portion of the corpus callosum has been reported to be significantly larger in musicians than non-musicians. Research has shown that children with dyslexia tend to have smaller and less developed corpus callosums than their non-dyslexic counterparts.

It has been found that the Corpus Callosum was larger in professional musicians than in non-musicians. Playing instruments involves a lot of cross hemisphere processing to keep both hand’s movements in time with each other. This suggest that by regular practice the Corpus Callosum can be strengthened. The Dore Program, Interactive Metronome and primitive reflex based treatments such as INPP all involve cross-lateral movements designed to train this area of the brain. Other activities may also help. Such as computer games like Wii Drums and some aspects of Wii Fit may also help.
8. Fast ForWord Michael Merzenich developed a series of “plasticity-based computer programs known as Fast ForWord.” Fast ForWord offers seven brain exercises to help with the language and learning deficits of dyslexia.
9. Read, read, read Every time you read, you are accessing and using your left brain hemisphere. Because of Neuroplasticity (the brain's ability to change its structure and functioning), if you read regularly over a period of weeks, you will strengthen and even build new neuronal pathways.

If you are a parent with a dyslexic child, make sure that reading is NOT associated with frustration. You would not want to form neuronal pathways that relay the message to stay away from reading and that reading is frustrating.

Below are some techniques that have proven very successful.

1. Teach your child to say "help" whenever he/she cannot read a word.

2. Train your child's brain to say "help" so that it becomes an automatic response BEFORE the child experiences frustration. Frustration will make dyslexic symptoms worse.

3. If you notice frustration in your child, gently bring the reading to a close without your child noticing. You do not want to teach the child's brain to associate frustration with the message to stop reading.

4. Try to read with your child at a structured time. While many dyslexics do not like structure, it is good for their brain and learning a skill.

5. Be aware of your child's emotional and energetic state. Trying to read with a dyslexic child when he/she is tired, angry, worn out, only reinforces the dyslexic symptoms.

6. Be aware of your own emotional and energetic state. STOP reading when you get frustrated. Remember that the letters of a dyslexic child do not remain static on the page but move. Your child might be able to read the word 'was' at one time but the next time he/she sees the word it might look like 'saw'. Letters like u, v, w, n, h, m, easily turn for a dyslexic child and makes reading the words almost impossible until the brain is trained sufficiently.

7. Be aware of 'trigger' words. There are 'trigger' words that cause your child's brain to get disoriented and begin moving letters and words around. Some of those trigger words include "she, all, and, any, am, are, was, but, .... " For a complete list of trigger words, see Ronald Davis' book The Gift of Dyslexia which is available on Amazon.com

8. Choose reading materials that your child enjoys. Since trigger words are some of the easiest and basic reading words (but cause the most problems), it is more important to select reading materials that are interesting rather than the level of reading. Additionally, the brain of a dyslexic child can be extremely curious and demanding. Uninteresting reading materials will cause more problems.

9. While reading with your child, take breaks at periods. Dyslexic children initially run over periods and other punctuation marks. By stopping and discussing what you are reading at periods or end of paragraphs gives your child not only a break from reading (left brain hemisphere activity) but also a chance to be innovative (engage his right brain hemisphere).

10. Reading with a dyslexic child is an amazing experience. While you are training your child's brain to strengthen his interhemispheric transmission across the corpus callosum, you get new insights into the magic of moving letters, trigger words, and the innovative ideas that your child might have about the reading material.
10. Write, write, write A dyslexic's dominant right brain hemisphere is filled with innovative thoughts, ideas, and creativity. Since writing is an excellent way to bring those ideas to life, many dyslexic people become writers.

Even though dyslexic people struggle with spelling and language, many dyslexics become writers (Agatha Christie, Winston Churchill, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gustave Flaubert, W.B. Yeats).

Unfortunately, many of today's dyslexics do not practice the art of writing because reading, spelling, and following guidelines mean too much of a challenge.

Many dyslexic people also do not like to waste time. Writing essays with The Essay Writer software program is an excellent exercise in writing for dyslexics because the writer is guided with visual help (icons) through the writing process instead of long instructions that have to be read.

Essay writing is an excellent art for dyslexics because many dyslexic people not only have the most innovative ideas but are also destined to implement change and be the first in something. (Picasso, Alexander Graham Bell, John Rl Horner, Pierre Curie, Werner Von Braun, Henry Ford, George Washington, Leonardo da Vinci, Ann Bancroft).

Experiment with different ways of writing to find out which method is most conducive to bring out your creative thoughts. Writing on paper, on a typewriter, on a computer have different effects on different writers.

Experiment writing with left, right, or both hands. Research has shown that the functioning of the corpus callosum can be increased by different hand usage. (the right hand controls the left brain hemisphere, the left hand the right brain hemisphere, and by using both you are using both hemispheres.)

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8. The New Creative Mind and ADD/ADHD

If you have ADD, or think you might have it, learn about both the challenges as well as the strengths of ADD.
Symptoms of ADD/ADHD (Challenges):

  • Inability to maintain attention
  • Impulsive behaviors
  • Physical and motor restlessness
  • Not paying attention
  • Making careless mistakes
  • Not listening
  • Not finishing tasks
  • Not following directions
  • Being easily distracted
  • Fidgeting
  • Talking excessively
  • Running around at inappropriate times
  • Interrupting others
  • Having difficulty awaiting turns
Strengths:

The ability to focus on a multitude of tasks simultaneously. A unique ability to see ordinary things in extraordinary ways, to display unique personal observations and insights, to find a new approach to problems or issues, to make sudden and astonishing connections, to come up with non-conformist independent ideas, and to have a keen awareness of any sights, sounds, or movement.
 


According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), the symptoms of ADD/ADHD fall into three categories: inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, and combined. Modern research describes ADD or ADHD as a “neurobiological disorder resulting from problems in the dopamine neurotransmitter systems in the brain.” Most cases are genetically inherited. If a parent or close relative has ADD, there is a 30% or higher chance that a child will also have ADD. More generally, ADD/ADHD is characterized as the inability to maintain attention, impulsive behaviors, motor restlessness, not paying attention, making careless mistakes, not listening, not finishing tasks, not following directions, being easily distracted, fidgeting, talking excessively, running around at inappropriate times, interrupting others, and having difficulty awaiting turns. Source: What's the Deal with Learning Disabilities

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was first described more than 100 years ago.

ADHD affects an estimated 2 million children in the United States, or 3 to 5 percent of children. Studies show that 30 percent to 70 percent of these children will continue to experience ADHD symptoms as adults.

Symptoms of ADHD appear before age 7, last for six months or longer, and impair normal functioning in at least two types of settings — at school, among friends, at home, or at work ( in the case of adults).

Currently, no objective diagnostic test for ADHD exists.

Diagnosis requires a comprehensive evaluation, including a clinical interview, parent and teacher ratings, and, sometimes, learning disorder or psychological testing. Multiple evaluation techniques are required because healthy children occasionally show similar behavior, and other conditions, disorders, or environmental triggers — such as stress — may be associated with the same behaviors.

Twin and family studies show that ADHD has a strong genetic influence, and genes encoding components of dopamine and norepinephrine transmission have been implicated.

Studies increasingly are finding correlations between ADHD and differences in brain volume or function. Smaller volume and reduced activity are often observed in prefrontal cortical-striatal-cerebellar circuits, particularly in the right hemisphere. Recent studies show a delay in cortical development in some children with ADHD, speculated to represent the subgroup who “grow out” of the disorder.

Recent imaging studies are consistent with reduced catecholamine transmission in at least some patients with this disorder. As prefrontal circuits require an optimal level of catecholamine stimulation, reduced catecholamine transmission could lead to weakened prefrontal cortical regulation of attention and behavior and symptoms of ADHD.

ADHD is commonly treated with medications such as stimulants (e.g., methylphenidate) and newer, non stimulant drugs. These agents all act by enhancing catecholamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex.

Despite the widespread use of stimulants, concerns about their risks linger. Thus, parents and clinicians have to balance the benefits of a child with better attention and behavioral regulation on one hand, and the uncertainty about the risks of exposing children to psychotropic drugs on the other.

Our What's the Deal with Learning Disabilities eBook discusses in detail what the parents of famous people with ADD/ADHD did to enable their child to become successful.

If you or your child has ADD/ADHD, there are several actions that you can take to work with both your challenges as well as your strengths.
1. Genetics Since ADD/ADHD can be genetically inherited, explore and examine your ancestors' life for ADD/ADHD symptoms. In doing so, please keep in mind that what might be regarded as a disability today might have been an amazing ability in the past. Please refer to the list above for both challenges as well as strengths in your family history research.
2. Environment Besides genetics, environment can have a major impact on a child with ADD/ADHD. The book "What's the Deal with Learning Disability" describes what the parents of Thomas Edison, Galileo Galilei, Orville Wright, and Michael Phelps did differently to enable their child to become successful.

Dedicate two 24-hour periods to taking notes about your child's environment and his/her behavior in a specific environment. One period should include a child's academic environment while the other period should include a weekend day. Most schools should allow a parent to shadow a child's school day.

During your observations, take notes when your child is physically or mentally restless and when he/she is not restless. Your goal is actually to look for the times when your child is not physically or mentally restless because it will guide you in understanding your child's brain functioning better.

Since ADD/ADHD children are acutely observant and aware of sights, sounds, lights, and movement, pay attention to those influences on your child's brain.

After your two periods of observations and taking notes, use intermittent observation times to confirm or revise your original notes. If your child is taking medication, also record the times of administering the medication in your notes.

You can use your notes to modify your child's environment and to recreate certain environmental factors. If your child appears to be calmer and more focused in a certain section of a store, notice the next time you go to the store if the same section in the store has the same effect again.

In observing your child's environment and taking notes, you are empowering yourself with the choice of recreating positive environments and getting to know your child's brain better.
3. Neurobiology Since ADD/ADHD is considered to be a neurobiological disorder, understanding the most important aspects of neurobiology can help you in understanding your child's brain. Chapters 3 to 7 of this web page cover some important aspects of neurobiology.
4. Neuroplasticity Chapter 7 of The New Creative Mind web page discusses neuroplasticity and the brain's ability to restructure itself and to form new neuronal pathways. Whether you have a child with ADD/ADHD or whether you are an adult with ADD/ADHD, knowing about neuroplasticity empowers your creative mind.

The challenge of having ADD/ADHD and neuroplasticity is that you might want to form many different neuronal pathways at the same time. Unfortunately, any growth - including that of the brain - takes time and patience.

You can make a list of things that you would like to develop and focus on a few of them. Not all of your neuronal pathways will respond positively to growth. Only action and experience will tell you what skills you will be able to work on and which ones will be too difficult. The Triple A Survival Guide for Emotions software will provide you with a list of actions to try and keep a record of all of your dates, actions, and experiences.
5. Exercise Meditation, Yoga, Swimming, Running, and Martial Arts have shown to be beneficial exercises for children and adults with ADD/ADHD. Unlike non-ADD/ADHD children and adults though, it is important to record whether you benefit from doing a variety of exercise activities continuously or to just focus on one.
6. Writing When it comes to writing, especially essay writing, many ADD/ADHD people struggle with too many ideas and distractions. The Essay Writer software program provides the opportunity to complete an essay in as little time as possible and thus many of those ADD/ADHD challenges do not interfere with the goal of finishing an essay. Since the program focuses on writing (not reading about writing), it becomes much easier for the ADD/ADHD writer to stay on topic and not to get distracted.
At any time and at any step, the essay can be saved allowing the ADD/ADHD writer to pursue several topics at once while increasingly developing the art of essay writing.
7. Divergent Energy In dealing with ADD/ADHD, it is important to remember that one of the strengths of ADD is the ability to focus on a multitude of tasks simultaneously. This divergent energy and interest in various things results easily in not completing a task. As the life of Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, and Thomas Edison have shown, (described in What's the Deal with Learning Disability), understanding and learning how to use this divergent energy creatively can open up new paths and frontiers for the ADD/ADHD mind.

In addition to the above insights for anyone dealing with ADD/ADHD, below are some additional important factors that affect ADD/ADHD:


"In 2008 the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in Washington, DC, petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban artificial food dyes because of their connection to behavioral problems in children. Two years later a new CSPI report, Food Dyes: A Rainbow of Risks, further concludes that the nine artificial dyes approved in the United States likely are carcinogenic, cause hypersensitivity reactions and behavioral problems, or are inadequately tested. Artificial dyes derived from petroleum are found in thousands of foods. In particular breakfast cereals, candy, snacks, beverages, vitamins, and other products aimed at children are colored with dyes. Even some fresh oranges are dipped in dye to brighten them and provide uniform color, says Michael Jacobson, executive director at CSPI. ..Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6 contain benzidene, a human and animal carcinogen permitted in low, presumably safe levels in dyes... Meanwhile, in Europe, as of July 2010 most foods that contain artificial dyes must carry labels warning they may cause hyperactivity in children. “ (Source: Environmental Health Perspectives)


"Meditation has been used as an attention training method for many thousands of years, and was mostly involved with religious or spiritual practices in various parts of the world, especially in the eastern countries. Breathing meditation is a popular method which can be applied to all people without instructions that are too complicated. In meditation therapy, by breathing meditation which is specified to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, benefits this group of patients, it would be very useful, culturally appropriate, cost-effective and would reduce the drugs used which will save the child from drug side effects." Source: ClinicalTrials.gov


The United States Institute of Health continuously conducts research about the "Functional MRI of Relaxation Response Training in Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)". It also conducts research about the benefits of meditation, yoga, and other relaxation techniques for adult and children with ADD or ADHD. Check for latest studies at ClinicalTrials.gov

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9. The New Creative Mind and Emotions

Emotions are a powerful force. They can create and destroy. Emotions are also a powerful force because they are one of the most influential motivators that can propel us into action and experience and thus the formation of new neuronal pathways.


Generally, the limbic system is considered to be the "emotional brain". The limbic system is tightly connected to the prefrontal cortex and there is some evidence that the left prefrontal cortex is activated by positive stimuli. Additional factors affecting emotions are the neurotransmitters Serotonin, Dopamine, and Noradrenalin.

Different areas of the limbic system have a strong control over emotions such as pleasure, pain, anger, fear, sadness, sexual feelings and affection.


The major parts of the limbic system include the thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus.

Thalamus:
The thalamus relays sensory and motor signals to the cerebral cortex and regulates consciousness, sleep, and alertness.

Hypothalamus:
The hypothalamus links the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland. It is roughly the size of an almond. The hypothalamus controls body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue, and sleep.

Amygdala:
The amygdala performs a primary role in the processing and memory of emotional reactions. It is involved with strong feelings of rage or aggression.

Hippocampus:
The hippocampus helps control the transferring of present experiences into permanent memories. It is also closely linked to the cerebral cortex. In Alzheimer's disease, the hippocampus is one of the first regions of the brain to suffer damage. Memory problems and disorientation appear among the first symptoms.
limbic

Source: MedicalArtLibrary.com

The fact that emotions are mainly processed in the limbic system and not in the prefrontal cortex (area for conscious thought and decision making) makes many individuals feel powerless when it comes to dealing with emotions. Feeling powerless and regarding emotions as something that has to be managed or controlled though, misses the true potential of emotions and the impact they can have on our life.

For the old creative mind, emotions were a source of inspiration that was often guided by innate talent or intuition. Many composers, musicians, writers, painters, sculptors, and other artists were able to bring the powerful force of emotions to life in their art. Unfortunately, being to able to feel and artistically express those emotions also came with the price of melancholy, depression, anger, fear, or despair. (Our eBook What's the Deal with Learning Disabilities discusses in detail the challenging emotions that many famous artists experienced)

Unlike the past, the new creative mind can be much more empowered. Today, the powerful force of emotions can serve not only as an inspiration for art and creativity but also as a powerful force for personal growth.

With a new understanding of creativity and how our brain functions, the new creative mind can use emotions to access and connect different areas of the brain. The interconnectedness of different areas of the new creative mind through the power of emotions can be seen in the life and work of Steve Jobs (connecting art and science), Bill Gates (connecting science and philanthropy), George Clooney, (acting and humanitarian work), Salman Khan (technology and teaching), and many more ..... Unlike the creative mind of the past, people with a new creative mind can use the powerful force of emotions to explore areas of interest beyond their initial field of expertise and interest.

What is the difference
between an emotionally oversensitive person and emotionally disabled person?
Emotional Disability Emotionally Oversensitive Person
An emotional disability may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following conditions:

• A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems

• A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression

• An inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors

• An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships

• Inappropriate behaviors or feelings under normal circumstances

• Hyperactivity (short attention span, impulsiveness)

• Aggression/self-injurious behavior (acting out, fighting)

• Withdrawal (failure to initiate interaction with others, retreat from exchanges of social
interaction, excessive fear or anxiety)

• Immaturity (inappropriate crying, temper tantrums, poor coping skills)

• Learning difficulties (academically performing below grade level)

Many of the above symptoms mimic the symptoms of children with Dyslexia or ADD. However, while
children with Dyslexia display highly perceptual abilities and children with ADD display highly versatile energetic abilities, children with ED display highly emotional abilities.

An emotionally oversensitive person is able to feel the depths and heights of human emotions more intensely than another person.


Ideally, those emotions result in a creative outpouring and tremendous personal growth.


Finding a balance between one's art and one's social relationships can be a challenge since both require time and energy.


It is estimated that 1 out of 5 people is an emotionally oversensitive person or emotionally sensitive person. Look at 5 people around you. The numbers might be even higher.


Without learning the skill of how to deal with being an oversensitive person, many people experience the symptoms listed under the Emotional Disability category to the left.
Source: Our What's the Deal With Learning Disability eBook  

If you are dealing with an emotional disability, or if you are an emotionally sensitive person, please visit our Emotions web page for actions you can take and to read about examples of people that have successfully turned their emotional disability/sensitivity into amazing talents.

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10. Symptoms Overview: Learning Disabilities Challenges & Strengths


Symptoms of Dyslexia (Challenges):
  • Usage of incorrect or inconsistent spelling
  • Skipping lines or words while reading or writing
  • Leaving out punctuation marks,
  • Tendency to omit, alter or substitute words
  • Confusing sounds like ch, th, sh,
    Confusing similar looking words like from/form, on/no
  • Struggling with short term memory
  • Confusing left/right, over/under, up/down,
  • Being uncoordinated
  • Showing poor time management skills
  • Struggling with sequences of letters or numbers
  • struggling with changed or reversed shapes
  • left-right confusion
  • difficulty remembering ordered lists, such as the months of the year
  • difficulty remembering a group of unrelated facts like the multiplication table
  • problems with fine motor control in handwriting
  • visual problems associated with motor control of the eyes



Symptoms of ADD/ADHD (Challenges):

  • Inability to maintain attention
  • Impulsive behaviors
  • Physical and motor restlessness
  • Not paying attention
  • Making careless mistakes
  • Not listening
  • Not finishing tasks
  • Not following directions
  • Being easily distracted
  • Fidgeting
  • Talking excessively
  • Running around at inappropriate times
  • Interrupting others
  • Having difficulty awaiting turns


Symptoms of Emotional Disability (Challenges):
  • A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems
  • A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression
  • An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships
  • Inappropriate behaviors or feelings under normal circumstances
  • Difficulty keeping focused
  • Aggression towards others (acting out, fighting, violence)
  • Aggression towards self, self-injurious behavior
  • Withdrawal (failure to initiate interaction with others)
  • Excessive fear or anxiety
  • mild bipolar/schizophrenic characteristics
  • High expectations of self and others.
  • Self-doubt
  • Alienation toward self or others
  • Alcoholism, drug use,
  • Depression
  • Suicide
Strengths:

Unique and innovative visual thinking, spatial ability, pattern recognition, problem solving, heightened intuition and creativity. Instead of going from point A to B, you prefer going your own individual way. To see a list of famous people with Dyslexia and their abilities, click here.
























Strengths:

The ability to focus on a multitude of tasks simultaneously. A unique ability to see ordinary things in extraordinary ways, to display unique personal observations and insights, to find a new approach to problems or issues, to make sudden and astonishing connections, to come up with non-conformist independent ideas, and to have a keen awareness of any sights, sounds, or
movement. To see a list of famous people with ADD/ADHD, click here.








Strengths:


The ability to feel and perceive emotions at the highest and deepest levels. Highly intuitive, imaginative, expressive. Potential writer, poet, musician, composer, singer, sculptor,painter, actor. To see a list of famous people with emotional disability, click here.


To see a visual depiction of the three major emotional levels, click here.





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11. Frequently Asked Questions

1. I am not sure if I have a learning disability, how can I find out?

Take a look at the challenges and the strengths of the major learning disabilities in the Symptoms Overview chapter above. Since Dyslexia, ADD/ADHD, and Emotional Sensitivity is most often genetically inherited, explore and examine also your ancestors' life for the listed symptoms. In doing so, please keep in mind that what might be regarded as a disability today might have been an amazing ability in the past.

If you find that any of the characteristics apply to you or your ancestors, you might greatly benefit from reading the chapters above and the What's the Deal with Learning Disabilities eBook. The content of the web page and the eBook will provide you with the most recent information about learning disabilities.

If you think you might have a learning disability, but you are not sure, FIND OUT. Either your doctor, school, educational on-campus Health Services, or your general Health Care provider will help you to find out if you have a learning disability. If you are a college student, you can begin by going to the Student Services office or Health Services office of your higher educational institution. You need to explore your disability to better recognize your amazing ability. Reading Tips #1 to #5 above will explain more why a diagnosis can be a great benefit.


2. What do I do if I am diagnosed with a learning disability?

If you have a learning disability, KNOW that you are in the company of Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Beethoven, Agatha Christie, Tom Cruise, Whoopie Goldberg, and Robin Williams. Being in the company of some of the most creative people, comes with a big responsibility. You have an exciting journey and destiny in front of you!

The more you know the more productively you will be able to deal with both your strengths and your weaknesses. Learn from the past, the present, and the future. Our What's the Deal with Learning Disability eBook is easy to read and discusses the experiences of many famous people from the past and present and their learning disabilities. The eBook also describes in detail what those famous people did that contributed to their success.

Take action --- neuroplasticity (the brain's ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections through action and experience) puts you in charge of exploring the many possibilities that are open to you for both your challenges and your talents.

Our New Creative Mind web page explains neuroplasticity in detail and we continue to include the most recent neuroscientific research on learning disabilities.



3. Do you have any stories of how people successfully deal with learning disabilities today?

You can read the success stories of people with learning disabilities by clicking here.



4. Where can I find out more information about emotional disabilities, depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia?

Please visit our The New Creative Mind web page chapters on Neuroscience and Emotional Disabilities for more information in regard to these specific topics.


5. I have a question that has not been asked yet here, where can I find an answer?

If you have a question about learning disabilities, you can contact us at Exploration@cox.net


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What's the Deal with Learning Disability eBook

LDBook


"This book offers a complete new insight
into the topic of learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, and Emotional Disability (emotionally sensitive people).


By reading this book, you will discover:
  • a new perspective on the topic of learning disabilities

  • a new understanding of the amazing ability behind a person's disability.

  • a new insight into Emotional Disabilities and emotionally sensitive people.

  • why children and adults are so easily misdiagnosed.

  • valuable life lessons of famous people that are attributed with a learning disability or ADD including Leonardo Da Vinci, Pablo Picasso, Agatha Christie, Charles Schwab, King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, Whoopie Goldberg, Henry Winkler, Cher, Michael Phelps,Thomas Edison, Wilbur and Orville Wright, Albert Einstein, Beethoven, Hans Christian Andersen, and Winston Churchill.

  • why a misdiagnoses can become a matter of life and death.

  • why so many treatments, behavior modification plans, and interventions fail.

  • Our eBook discusses the symptoms of learning disabilities, Dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, and Emotional Disability (emotionally sensitive people). It also discusses signs of learning disabilities, how to deal with learning disabilities, characteristics of learning disabilities, and what to do about learning disabilities. In addition to our eBook, our Website pages on learning disabilities and neuroscience provide the most updated information, insights, tips, and techniques.
  • why the failure or misunderstanding of the true nature of learning disability can lead to high school drop outs, alcoholism, depression, suicide, or defiance and why so many of today's famous people end up in rehab. Please visit our Learning Disability Iceberg Principle chapter for a visual depiction.

  • how children learn "to be disabled”.

  • what you can do to better understand your life's path or the path of your child's life -- today.

Did you Know?
Many famous people like Henry Winkler (the Fonz), Charles Schwab, King Carl Gustaf of Sweden, Cher, and Whoopie Goldberg did NOT find out that they had a learning disability until they were adults. Emily Dickinson, Beethoven, and many other composers, poets, and writers NEVER knew they had (what is diagnosed today as) an Emotional Disability.

If you do not know if you have a learning disability, or if you are an emotionally sensitive person, please read this 42-page eBook. It covers all symptoms, characteristics, experiences, and some ideas on what your life's destiny might be. Reading this eBook might instantly change your life!


LDbooklet
Learning Disability
Instant Download eBook
$9.95
You will receive your instant download eBook immediately after your purchase is completed. Please contact us at Exploration@cox.net if you have any questions.


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Our Published articles on Dyslexia, Attention Deficit Disorder, Emotional Disabilities, and other topics of interest:


How I Overcame My Depression

How to Deal with Depression: Meaning and Purpose of a Depression - a Modern Messenger

How to Remember Your Dreams in 30 Seconds – Without Having to Write!

How to Deal with the Symptoms of Attention Deficit Disorder: “The Shoe Trick”

How to Teach Children with Dyslexia: 6 Tips for Success

How to Leave High School Early – Without Dropping Out

How to Save and Earn Money in College: The 6 Most Important Tips

How I Became a Better Listener in One Easy Step

Sexual Abuse in Boys and Girls - the Silent Victims of the Economy: “Into the Arms of Strangers”

Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment of Auditory Processing Disorder

Emotional disabilities in children: A silent killer

Symptoms and Diagnosis: Attention Deficit Disorder or Emotional Disability?

Depression in men: Women cry – men just die.

Emotional disabilities in children: A silent killer


For more articles, please visit our Creative Mind Links page or click here.